What is Coat of Silence?

Coat Of Silenceis a scientifically proven 2-step sound reduction solution for use on interior walls, ceilings, drywall and plaster. It's the perfect choice for those looking for an effective, easy to apply coating for interior sound reduction projects. It goes on like paint and doesn't require special skills to apply. In fact, it only takes one person with painting skills to perform the easy 2-step process.

What is Transmission Loss?

Transmission Loss is a measurement of a partition's ability to block sound at a given frequency, or the number of decibels that sound of a given frequency is reduced in passing through a partition. Measuring Transmission Loss over a range of 16 different frequencies between 125-4000 Hz is the basis for determining a partition's Sound Transmission Class.

What is an STC rating?

Technically speaking, STC stands for Sound Transmission Class, which is the measurement used to calculate the effectiveness of sound reduction materials in reducing sound transmission between rooms. It is a single-number rating of a material's or an assembly's ability to resist airborne sound transfer at the frequencies 125-4000 Hz. Simply put, it measures how much sound a wall, for instance, will block from getting through to the other side. Generally speaking, the higher the STC rating, the more effective a material is at blocking sound at the most common frequencies. Coat of Silence has the highest STC rating (52) of any coating on the market today.

STC is highly dependant on the construction of the partition. A partition's STC can be increased by:
  • Adding mass
  • Increasing or adding air space
  • Adding absorptive material within the partition

A partition is given an STC rating by measuring its transmission loss over a range of 16 different frequencies between 125-4000 Hz. 125-4000 Hz is consistent with the frequency range of speech. The STC rating does not assess the low frequency sound transfer. Special consideration must be given to spaces where the noise transfer concern is other than speech, such as mechanical equipment or music.

Even with a high STC rating, any penetration, air-gap, or "flanking" path can seriously degrade the isolation quality of a wall. Flanking paths are the means for sound to transfer from one space to another other than through the wall. Sound can flank over, under, or around a wall. Sound can also travel through common ductwork, plumbing or corridors. Noise will travel between spaces at the weakest points. There is no reason to spend money or effort to improve the walls until all the weak points are controlled.

The STC rating is based on performance with frequencies from 125 to 4000 Hertz (the speech frequencies). The rating provides no evaluation of the barrier's ability to block low frequency noise, such as the bass in music or the noise of some mechanical equipment.

The STC rating is a lab test that does not take into consideration weak points, penetrations, or flanking paths. The field test however, does evaluate the entire assembly and includes all sound paths.

What is a recommended rating?

In general, loud speech can be understood fairly well through an STC 30 wall but should not be audible through an STC 60 wall. An STC of 50 is a common building standard and blocks approximately 50 dB from transmitting through the partition. However, occupants could still be subject to awareness, if not understanding, of loud speech. Constructions with a higher STC (as much as 10dB better - STC 60) should be specified in sensitive areas where sound transmission is a concern.

The Uniform Building Code (UBC) contains requirements for sound isolation for dwelling units in Group-R occupancies (including hotels, motels, apartments, condominiums, monasteries and convents).

UBC requirements for walls: STC rating of 50 (if tested in a laboratory) or 45 (if tested in the field*).

UBC requirements for floor/ceiling assemblies: STC ratings of 50 (if tested in a laboratory) or 45 (if tested in the field*). * The field test evaluates the dwelling's actual construction and includes all sound paths.

An assembly rated at STC 50 will satisfy the building code requirement. However, as mentioned above, occupants could still be subject to awareness, if not understanding, of loud speech. Therefore, it is typically argued that luxury accommodations require a more stringent design goal.

What is sound blocking?

Sound blocking prevents sound from entering or leaving a room. Sound blocking is measured by STC ratings. The higher a product's STC rating is, the more effective the product will be.

How does Coat of Silence work?

Our Coat Of Silence resilient layer (base coat) is scientifically formulated to deflect sound transmission with a 52 STC rating. This high performance rating has never been accomplished in a coating before. The SBR (styrenated buradiene rubber) forms an actual rubber membrane as it dries/cures along with a heavy bodied water based latex and sound absorbing fillers that deflect sound and keep it contained. Our Finish Coat has the same sound deflecting formula with a hardening agent to make a complete sound reduction system. The Finish Coat can be painted over with any type of paint and will satisfy any decorating concerns.

How do I apply Coat of Silence?

Coat of Silence goes on like paint and doesn't require special skills to apply. In fact, it only takes one person with painting skills to perform the easy 2-step process. Because of product thickness, stir thoroughly for 2 to 5 minutes with drill or paddle. For best sound reduction results, two coats of our Base Coat is recommended. Simply apply by sprayer, let dry to touch, then apply the second base coat. To complete the 2-step process, use Coat of Silence Finish Coat, which can be painted over with any type of paint. For additional instructions, please refer to APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

What do I have to do for surface preparation?

Areas to be covered must be thoroughly cleaned and free of dust, dirt, grease and wax.

How long should I wait in between coats?

Coat of Silence dries to the touch in approximately 20 minutes. Please note, low temperatures or higher humidity will lengthen dry times. Once it is dry to the touch, you may begin with the next coat.

Can it be painted over?

Yes. Coat of Silence Finish Coat can be painted over with any type of paint including latex or enamel.

Is Coat of Silence toxic?

No. Coat of Silence is water based and non-toxic. It is also mold, mildew and water-resistant. As with all products, paints, coatings, etc., you should use proper precautions and read the MSDS before using Coat of Silence.

Is Coat of Silence a fire hazard?

No. Coat of Silence has been fire tested and is not a fire hazard.

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